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Tuesday, May 24, 2016 – Fenway Park, Section 40

Red Sox 8, Rockies 3

The Colorado Rockies were the next victims for the Red Sox, who have their offense working at Fenway as if they were in the thin air of mile-high Coors Field.  They jumped out to a 2-0 lead in the first, then added two more in the second.  And Jackie Bradley Jr. wasted no time knocking the first pitch of his first at-bat off the Green Monster to extend his hitting streak to 28 games.  My favorite pictures from the game are below.

David Price had a solid outing, his third since fixing his mechanics earlier in the month.

David Price had a solid outing, his third since fixing his mechanics earlier in the month.

Big Papi drove in two runs with a single in the first inning, and two more with a double in the fourth.

Big Papi drove in two runs with a single in the first inning, and two more with a double in the fourth.

I had a nice seat in Section 40, in the second row behind the Red Sox bullpen.

I had a nice seat in Section 40, in the second row behind the Red Sox bullpen.

Dustin Pedroia jumps as a Rockies batter swings. Pedey had a good night, reaching base four times on three hits and a walk.

Dustin Pedroia jumps as a Rockies batter swings. Pedey had a good night, reaching base four times on three hits and a walk.

JBJ was all smiles after extending his hitting streak in his first at-bat. It's up to 28 now.

JBJ was all smiles after extending his hitting streak in his first at-bat. It's up to 28 now.

With all the focus on Jackie Bradley's hitting streak, Xander Bogaerts is flying under the radar with a 17-game streak that he extended in the first inning.  Some fans in my section got to re-use their #XforASG sign from last year when we were trying to vote Xander in to the All-Star Game as the final player.  They had crossed out 2015 and written 2016 on the sign.

With all the focus on Jackie Bradley's hitting streak, Xander Bogaerts is flying under the radar with a 17-game streak that he extended in the first inning. Some fans in my section got to re-use their #XforASG sign from last year when we were trying to vote Xander in to the All-Star Game on the final vote ballot. They had crossed out 2015 and written 2016 on the sign.

Not only does Xander deserve to go to the All-Star Game this year, but a bunch of his teammates should join him.  Balloting is all online this year, and it’s already started, so don’t wait until the final days to vote.  Vote 5 times a day, up to 35 votes per mlb.com account, at this link.  #EveryoneForASG

Mookie Betts asked for a few throws down low as he warmed up between innings.

Mookie Betts asked for a few throws down low as he warmed up between innings.

Not pitching to Papi? Boo!

Not pitching to Papi? Boo!

This is something we won’t be seeing much of in the future.  Not just because Big Papi’s retiring, but because the intentional walk may go away with him.  There’s a proposed rule change to just let the pitcher signal that he wants to walk the batter without actually throwing the pitches, supposedly to speed up the game.  I hate this idea!  The argument I hear most often is that there’s a chance that the ball gets away from the catcher and the runners could advance.  But my biggest objection is that it won’t take a toll on the pitcher’s pitch count.  One of the biggest strengths of the Red Sox offense of the past decade-plus has been the ability to drive up the starter’s pitch count, get him out of the game sooner, and face more middle relievers.  If a pitcher wants to skip a certain batter, he needs to pay a price, not keep his arm fresh for facing someone else later.  And how much time would that really save anyway?  Why is two extra minutes so awful?  Isn’t the rhythm and cadence of baseball what we all fell in love with in the first place?  (Plus watching those four pitches gives us extra time to boo!)

The outfield dance at the end of each win has gained some new steps.  Now Mookie Betts and Chris Young mime taking pitcures of Jackie Bradley Jr. before running in to join the rest of the team after a win.

The outfield dance at the end of each win has gained some new steps. Now Mookie Betts and Chris Young mime taking pitcures of Jackie Bradley Jr. before running in to join the rest of the team.

Another fun win was in the books, and the only downside was that no Red Sox players homered for the first time in the last 23 games.  The 22-game homer streak set a new franchise record, and you can watch a montage of all the homers during the streak on youtube.

May 24, 2016 • Posted in: 2016 Games • No Comments

Triple Threat

Sunday, May 22, 2016 – Fenway Park, Section 42

Red Sox 5, Indians 2

When weather people on TV give the temperature and then say what it “feels like” to account for the heat index or wind chill, there really should be a third category – Fenway bleachers.  As in, “The game time temperature is 59, with the humidity it feels like 65, but in the bleachers it’s 78.”  That’s how this game was.  The forecast had called for a high of 57 and rain, and since I was half-way back in the bleachers I had a long-sleeved shirt under my T-shirt plus a warm coat in case I got soaked.  There was a light mist during batting practice, but that was it.  I changed from the long-sleeved shirt into the T-shirt before the game started, and before long the sun came out and I was wishing I had shorts.  People in the rest of the park had long sleeves and jackets, but the bleachers are a totally different climate!

Eduardo Rodriguez warmed up with the rest of the pitchers inthe outfield.  He's still on a rehab stint for his knee injury, but I'm looking forward to seeing him back in the rotation soon.

Eduardo Rodriguez warmed up with the rest of the pitchers in the outfield during batting practice. He's still on a rehab stint for his knee injury, but I'm looking forward to seeing him back in the rotation soon.

Koji Uehara plays long-toss in front of the bottom of the A.L. East standings.

Koji Uehara shags flies in front of the bottom of the A.L. East standings.

Rick Porcello labored a bit in the second when he needed 33 pitches and gave up 2 runs. But he recovered nicely after that, and ended up going 5-2/3 without allowing anything else. And that was nothing compared to Cleveland's Danny Salazar, who threw 40 pitches in the first and 29 more in the second.  The first two innings lasted an hour and ten minutes and saw a combined 125 pitches.

Rick Porcello warms up in the pen.

Rick Porcello labored a bit in the second when he needed 33 pitches and gave up 2 runs.  But he recovered nicely after that, and ended up going 5-2/3 without allowing anything else.  And that was nothing compared to Cleveland’s Danny Salazar, who threw 40 pitches in the first and 29 more in the second.  The first two innings lasted an hour and ten minutes and saw a combined 125 pitches, with the Sox leading 3-2.

The Red Sox got off to their usual good start, with two runs in the first (on RBI singles by David Ortiz and Hanley Ramirez) and one run in the second (on a ground-rule double by Ortiz). When Big Papi came up in the fifth, he smacked his third hit of the day, home run #514 of his career.

The Red Sox got off to their usual good start, with two runs in the first (on RBI singles by David Ortiz and Hanley Ramirez) and one run in the second (on a ground-rule double by Ortiz). When Big Papi came up in the fifth, he smacked his third hit of the day, home run #514 of his career.

Jackie Bradley Jr. walked in the first and struck out in the third, but then picked up a hit in the fifth, to extend his impressive hitting streak to 27 games.

Jackie Bradley Jr. walked in the first and struck out in the third, but then picked up a hit in the fifth, to extend his impressive hitting streak to 27 games.

Papi came up again in the sixth, needing a triple for the cycle, but he was intentionally walked.  Aw, Tito (and Brad Mills), how could you?

Papi came up again in the sixth, needing a triple for the cycle, but with first base open he was intentionally walked. Aw, Tito (and Brad Mills), how could you?

During the seventh inning stretch I moved around behind the visitors' dugout, where we gave old friend Mike Napoli a nice had as he walked off the field each inning.  He was kind enough to strike out three times for us.  (It was cooler but pleasant in the shade.  Does that look like a rainy, 57-degree day to you?)

During the seventh inning stretch I moved around behind the visitors' dugout, where we gave old friend Mike Napoli a nice hand as he walked off the field each inning. He was kind enough to strike out three times for us. (It was cooler but pleasant in the shade. Does that look like a rainy, 57-degree day to you?)

Big Papi came up again in the bottom of the eighth.  With a single, a double, and a homer (plus a walk) already in the game, we all knew he needed a triple to complete the cycle.  As he strode to the plate, I remembered how he had just hit one the previous weekend (in the ninth to tie last Saturday’s game).  That hit had gone into “the triangle” in the deepest part of center field and bounced around.  If he wanted to hit one now, that’s what he was going to have to do again.

"Papi for MVP" indeed. That would be such a fitting way for him to retire. (If voting took place right now, his biggest competition would be his own teammates Bradley and Boagerts.)

"Papi for MVP" indeed. That would be such a fitting way for him to retire!

He worked a 3-1 count, as he always seems to do, and then he launched one.  I couldn’t believe it, but it was heading right for the triangle!  It went over the center fielder’s head and hit the warning track in front of the 420-foot marker, then bounced and hit off the top of the padding on the wall.  I took my eye off it to watch him run – he was halfway to second and going full steam – when I saw him stop.  The ball had gone to the exact place he needed it to, but it had taken an unfavorable bounce off the padding on the wall and (just barely) cleared the fence, landing in the stands for a ground-rule double.  A few inches difference would have kept it in the park, and he would have made it easily into third.  We gave him a nice ovation for the effort and laughed as he stood on second miming a running motion like he was ready to keep going.

[Note:  I've been keeping score at games for 16 years, and while my notation for recording plays hasn't changed, I noticed that my scorecards have evolved with the times... because I now use emoticons.  My note for this play was "Bounced into stands  :(  He totally would have made it."]

I don’t think I’ve ever been more bummed out by a double hit by someone on my team.  But thinking about it after the game put it in a new perspective.  He knew that for him to get a triple there was really only one place he could put it, and that’s exactly where he put it!  How does he do that, time after time after time?  It’s brilliant really, and why he’s (tied with Pedro as) my all-time favorite player.

Craig Kimbrel made quick work of the Indians in the ninth, with two strikeouts and a fly to Blake Swihart in left field. Swihart did a good job in what was just his third career game in the outfield.  Early in the game he made a barehanded play of a ball off the wall, holding the runner to a single.  And later he made a nice running grab of a ball in the narrow foul territory area.  And most importantly, he proved to be a quick learner of the outfield dance that they do at the end of every win.

Craig Kimbrel made quick work of the Indians in the ninth, with two strikeouts and a fly to Blake Swihart in left field. Swihart did a good job in what was just his third career game in the outfield. Early in the game he made a barehanded play of a ball off the wall, holding the runner to a single. And later he made a nice running grab of a ball in the narrow foul territory area. And most importantly, he proved to be a quick learner of the outfield dance that they do at the end of every win.

This ended up being my favorite game of the year so far.

This ended up being my favorite game of the year so far.

May 22, 2016 • Posted in: 2016 Games • No Comments

On the Offensive

May 12, 2016 – Fenway Park, Section 43

Red Sox 11, Astros 1

The big story before the game was that Dustin Pedroia had spotted something in David Price’s delivery while watching videos of his past at-bats against left-handed pitchers.  Price wasn’t bringing his hands and leg up as high this season.  The pitcher concurred, said that could help explain the drop in his velocity this year, and vowed to fix his mechanics before his next start.  Today we would find out if Pedey should double as a pitching coach in addition to his duties at second base.

David Price warms up in the bullpen before the game.

David Price warms up in the bullpen before the game.

The verdict was good - Price struck out the side in the first and second, and again in the fifth, finishing with a total of 12. His fastballs were a few mph faster than they had been earlier this year too.

The verdict was good - Price struck out the side in the first and second, and again in the fifth, finishing with a total of 12. His fastballs were a few mph faster than they had been earlier this year too.

Here's the new pitching coach himself. Pedey should get the Cy Young to go along with his Rookie of the Year and MVP.

Here's the new pitching coach himself. Pedey should get the Cy Young to go along with his Rookie of the Year and MVP.

It was a gorgeous night for baseball. After sitting through a bunch of cold games in April, I was in a t-shirt tonight and didn't put on my hoodie till the 7th inning stretch.

It was a gorgeous night for baseball. After sitting through a bunch of cold games in April, I was in a t-shirt tonight and didn't need my hoodie till the 7th inning stretch.

Jackie Bradley Jr. was having a scorching-hot week at the plate. Tonight he was 2-for-4 and extended his hitting streak to 18 games.

Jackie Bradley Jr. remained scorching-hot at the plate. Tonight he was 2-for-4 and extended his hitting streak to 18 games.

The K-Men were busy tonight, counting Price's 12 strikeouts and cheering for David Ortiz.

The K-Men were busy all night, keeping track of Price's 12 strikeouts and cheering for David Ortiz.

Big Papi breaks his bat.

Big Papi breaks his bat.

The moon rises over Fenway as Houston right fielder George Springer chases after yet another Boston moonshot.

The moon rises over Fenway as Houston right fielder George Springer chases after yet another Boston moonshot.

Big Papi and Xander Bogaerts jumped to congratulate each other during the post-game celebration.

Big Papi and Xander Bogaerts jumped to congratulate each other during the post-game celebration.

It ended up a fun night as the Red Sox cruised to an 11-1 win.  Xander Bogaerts put them up early with a homer in the first, and Mookie Betts put the game out of reach with a three-run blast in the sixth.  It was the fourth straight game in which they had scored 11 or more runs.

May 12, 2016 • Posted in: 2016 Games • No Comments

Then And Now

Monday, May 9, 2016 – Fenway Park, Section 30

Red Sox 14, A’s 7

May 9 is what I like to call my “Fenniversary” – the anniversary of my first game at Fenway, 29 years ago in 1987.  Since I was in the park again on that date, I decided to start by heading out to the same seat I was in that day (Section 8, row TT) and take some pictures from the same angle.  I originally planned to take a couple of quick pics and then head to my real seat, but the sun was directly in my eyes when I got there so I had to wait a while for it to sink behind the third base stands.  The lighting is different right before sunset than during an afternoon game, but otherwise I think I got them right.  (They’re black and white because that’s what I had in my 110 camera for a school project at the time.)

Fenway Park, 1987 and 2016.  It looks so different without the club section behind home plate (which was added in 1989), just one lone tree peeking up.

Fenway Park, 1987 and 2016. It looks so different without the club section behind home plate (which was added in 1989), just one lone tree peeking up.

The shape of the outfield seats and bullpens hasn't changed, but the back wall was lowered and all the scoreboards added.

The shape of the outfield seating area and bullpens hasn't changed, but the back wall was lowered and all the scoreboards added. Also, painter's caps were popular in the 80's.

Left: Dwight Evans in right, Ellis Burks in center, and a screen over the Green Monster. Right: Mookie Betts in right, Jackie Bradley Jr. in center, and seats (and a bunch of ads) on the Green Monster.

Left: Dwight Evans in right, Ellis Burks in center, and a screen over the Green Monster. Right: Mookie Betts in right, Jackie Bradley Jr. in center, and seats (and a bunch of ads) on the Green Monster.

It was Star Wars Day at Fenway (they played on the road on May 4th, which is the traditional day) and they played the following video before the game, starting with “A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away…”



Since I had waited for the sun to set to take my pictures, I was still out in Section 8 in right field when the game started.  Usually I don’t like to get up while an inning is in progress, but with Clay Buchholz pitching so slowly, I couldn’t wait till the inning break.  He walked the first batter on a full count, and then when he threw ball 2 to the second batter I got up.  As I walked around behind the back row of the grandstand, the second batter doubled, driving in a run, and then the third batter grounded out.  By the time the fourth batter flied out on a 3-1 count, I was in my seat, meaning that I was able to go all the way from Section 8 near Pesky’s Pole to Section 30 in left field and only miss one at-bat!

Christian Vazquez and Clay Buchholz talk things over on the mound.

Christian Vazquez and Clay Buchholz talk things over on the mound.

Buchholz’s pace was an indication that this would not be an early night.  But by the time he exited at the end of the fifth, the game was going long for an entirely different reason.  The Red Sox offense turned a 4-1 deficit into a 7-4 lead with a 6-run fourth inning and never looked back.  When they’re scoring like that, I’ll sit there happily all night!

Jackie Bradley Jr. had a great night - three hits, including a grand slam, and six RBI.

Jackie Bradley Jr. had a great night - three hits, including a grand slam, and six RBI.

I normally wouldn't post a picture that was blocked by someone in front of me, but it's OK - the guy in the row in front of me got up and danced after all 14 of the Red Sox' runs scored. Christian Vazquez and Hanley Ramirez wave to Travis Shaw as he crosses the plate in the fourth... "Hi, Travis!" "Hey guys!"

I normally wouldn't post a picture that was blocked by someone in front of me, but it's OK - the guy in the row in front of me got up and danced after all 14 of the Red Sox' runs scored. But this cracks me up - Christian Vazquez and Hanley Ramirez greet Travis Shaw as he crosses the plate in the fourth... "Hi Travis! Travis, Travis, over here!" "Oh, hey guys!"

Big Papi is ready to go. He had two doubles and a single on the night.

Big Papi is ready to go. He had two doubles and a single on the night.

Just how many people were on base for Jackie Bradley Jr.'s grand slam? Half the team is there to greet him at home plate!

Just how many people were on base for Jackie Bradley Jr.'s grand slam? Half the team is there to greet him at home plate!

This was my first chance to see Carson Smith this year. He walked a batter and worked around an error in a scoreless seventh. Unfortunately it was also my last chance to see him this year, as he ended up undergoing Tommy John surgery by the end of the month.

This was my first chance to see Carson Smith this year. He walked a batter and worked around an error in a scoreless seventh. Unfortunately it was also my last chance to see him this year, as he ended up undergoing Tommy John surgery by the end of the month.

I moved down closer to the field for the last two innings.

I moved down closer to the field for the last two innings.

Xander Bogaerts tosses the ball between innings.

Xander Bogaerts tosses the ball between innings.

The game went into the books as a 14-7 win, and I got a good shot of the outfielders celebrating the vistory.

The game went into the books as a 14-7 win, and I got a good shot of outfielders Chris Young, Jackie Bradley Jr., and Mookie Betts celebrating the vistory.

May 9, 2016 • Posted in: 2016 Games • No Comments

Sweeping Up

Sunday, May 1, 2016 – Fenway Park, Section 2

Red Sox 8, Yankees 7

The Red Sox came into Sunday Night Baseball having beaten the Yankees on Friday and Saturday.  They started the day half a game behind the Orioles for first place in the East, while the Yankees sat in the basement, five games back.  The Orioles had already lost their afternoon game, so a win tonight would not only complete the sweep but put the Sox in first place.

It was cold enough to see my breath and raining steadily, so I didn’t go out to my bleacher seat.  I stayed in the standing room in the back of the grandstand in Section 2 in right field, eventually moving into an empty seat at the end of the fourth.

Christian Vazquez warms up in front of the bullpen as the grounds crew prepares to roll up the tarp. This was my first chance to see Vazquez this year as he returns from Tommy John surgery. He's been a favorite of mine since he was in the minors, so it's good to have him back!

Christian Vazquez warms up in front of the bullpen as the grounds crew prepares to roll up the tarp. This was my first chance to see Vazquez this year as he returns from Tommy John surgery. He's been a favorite of mine since he was in the minors, so it's good to have him back!

Mookie Betts lead off in front of a wet crowd. He

Mookie Betts leads off in front of a rain-soaked crowd. He opened with a single and came around to score the first run of the game.

Brock Holt dives back into first after a pickoff attempt.  When the ball skipped past Mark Teixeira, Brockstar scampered into second.

Brock Holt dives back into first after a pickoff attempt. When the ball skipped past Mark Teixeira, Brockstar scampered into second.

David Price wasn't sharp.  After the Red Sox jumped out to a 1-0 lead, he gave up three runs in the third to put them in a 3-1 hole.

David Price wasn't sharp. After the Red Sox jumped out to a 1-0 lead, he gave up three runs in the third to put them in a 3-1 hole. But he stayed in through the seventh as the offense rallied, pitching long enough to get credited with the win.

Mookie Betts beats the throw to first and reaches safely on a fielder's choice in the fourth.

Mookie Betts beats the throw to first and reaches safely on a fielder's choice in the fourth.

In the bottom of the third, the Sox put together four singles and a walk to score three more runs and retake the lead, 4-3.  Then in the fifth Price gave up three more runs, putting them down 6-4.  But the Red Sox continued to rally.  Travis Shaw’s two-run homer in the fifth tied the game at 6-6.  The rain stopped around that time, and during the seventh inning stretch I made my move to some vacated box seats behind third base.

Mookie Betts, dirt dog.

Mookie Betts, dirt dog.

Brock Holt, dirt dog.

Brock Holt, also a dirt dog.

Dustin Pedroia, perpetual dirt dog.

Dustin Pedroia, perpetual dirt dog.

Xander Bogaerts, dirt dog from Aruba, who's so cold he has to wear a ski mask, but not so cold he can't blow a bubble.

Xander Bogaerts, dirt dog from Aruba, who's so cold he has to wear a ski mask, but not so cold he can't blow a bubble.

I had just settled into my new seat, with the game tied 6-6, when Travis Shaw reached on a single.  He was replaced by Brock Holt on a fielder’s choice and then the Yankees went to the ‘pen to bring in their relief ace, Dellin Betances.  His first pitch to Christian Vazquez was launched way over the Green Monster, giving the Sox an 8-6 lead.

Christian Vazquez rounds third after his game-winning blast.

Christian Vazquez rounds third after his monstrous blast.

There was still the matter of holding the lead for the next two innings, and although the Yankees did score one against Koji Uehara in the eighth, Craig Kimbrel nailed it down in the ninth to preserve the win.  The Red Sox completed the sweep and moved into sole possession of first place, while the Yankees moved further into the basement where they belong.  Life is good!

Craig Kimbrel struck out two in a 1-2-3 ninth inning to close it out.

Craig Kimbrel struck out two in a 1-2-3 ninth inning to close it out.

May 1, 2016 • Posted in: 2016 Games • No Comments

Winner, Winner, Chicken Dinner

Saturday, April 30, 2016 – Fenway Park

VIP Tour and Player Meet & Greet

As a season ticket holder, I get rewards points for scanning my tickets at games and entering code words throughout the season.  One thing we can use the points for is to enter raffles, and I won one for a player meet and greet event that included a VIP tour of Fenway Park.  The experience is also part of packages sold through Red Sox Destinations, and the season ticket holder raffle winners got to join in.  We also got a a “David Ortiz final season” cap, a baseball and display case, and a free pair of Red Sox sneakers from Row One Brands as part of our prize pack.

Our day started with a tour of Fenway Park.  Remember that scene from “Forrest Gump” when he says he got invited to the White House again, and met the President of the United States again?  That’s how we felt sitting in the Green Monster seats and stepping onto the warning track.  As a season ticket holder, I can enter early and go up on the Green Monster before every game, and there have been plenty of open houses and other events where we’ve walked around the warning track before.  But what made this tour a one-of-a-kind special event is that we actually got to go inside the Green Monster, where the scoreboard operator posts the score during games!  As a lifelong fan, that’s something that’s always been on my baseball bucket list.  (We were asked not to sign our names, so I still have something to aspire to when I someday go in there again.)

For the scorekeepers inside the Green Monster, the only way they can see the game is by peeking through the slots like the one between my arm and the H. There's also a panel beyond my right shoulder that opens up so a camera can look out.

For the scorekeepers inside the Green Monster, the only way they can see the game is by peeking through the slots like the one between my arm and the H. There's also a panel beyond my right shoulder that opens up so a camera can look out.

Peek-a-boo!  Looking out through the camera window.

Peek-a-boo! Looking out through the camera window.

If you zoom in on the previous picture, you can see a tattoo left by a hard-hit wall-ball.

If you zoom in on the previous picture, you can see a tattoo left by a hard-hit wall-ball.

The plush accomodations for the scorekeepers.

The plush accomodations for the scorekeepers.

Peeking out through one of the little slots.

Peeking out through one of the little slots.

Inside the Green Monster!

Inside the Green Monster!

After everyone had had a chance to go inside the Green Monster, we sat in the grandstand seats and listened to the tour guides give a history of Fenway Park.  There was a game later that night, but for now, the grounds crew was out mowing the grass and getting the infield ready.  I spotted head groundskeeper David Mellor and his dog Drago (named after former Red Sox pitcher Dick Drago, I assume), whom I recognized from his Instagram account.

Fenway groundskeeper David Mellor and his dog, Drago.

Fenway groundskeeper David Mellor and his dog, Drago.

Next we walked down the fifth floor hallway past the radio and TV booths and the media cafeteria, and into the press box.

The media cafeteria.

The media cafeteria. Serving lemons and sour grapes daily.

In the press box.  The back row, where we sat, was added in 2007 when the Sox signed Daisuke Matsuzaka, to accomodate all the additional media who followed him around.  I sat next to the "umpire's seat" which I assume has communication to the umpires in New York who preside over replay calls.

In the press box. The back row, where we sat, was added in 2007 when the Sox signed Daisuke Matsuzaka, to accomodate all the additional media who followed him around. I sat next to the "umpire's seat" which I assume has communication to the umpires in New York who preside over replay calls.

View from the press box.

View from the press box.

Our last stop was the EMC Club, where we had a buffet lunch (hot dogs, chicken, pulled pork, salad, corn on the cob, potato salad, watermelon, cookies, and brownies).  Then we got to meet left fielder Brock Holt and get autographs and pictures with him.  There was a Q & A session, too, where people asked hard-hitting questions like what would you do if you didn’t play baseball (country singer), do you have any superstitions (no), and what’s your favorite position to play (anything but second because it means Dustin Pedroia is out).

These are the plates we ate on for the buffet. Great china pattern!

These are the plates we used for the buffet. Great china pattern!

The Brockstar and me.

Hanging out with the Brockstar.

Last up was a visit from Dick Flavin, the Boston humorist who serves as Fenway P. A. announcer during day games and the Poet Laureate of the Red Sox.  He recited several of his poems for us, some of which I had heard before, and some of which I hadn’t.  Here’s a video with two of my favorites, “Long Live Fenway Park,” written for its hundredth anniversary in 2012 and “Big Papi’s Bombs,” written in 2013.



Flavin has published a book with poems he’s written on the Red Sox – Red Sox Rhymes: Curses and Verses – and he autographed copies for people who bought them that day.  You can get your copy on Amazon.

April 30, 2016 • Posted in: Events • 1 Comment

We’re Home

Monday, April 11, 2016 – Fenway Park, Section 30

Orioles 9, Red Sox 7

Opening Day – the “real” one, at home – is my favorite day of the year.  This year it reminded me of a scene in the lastest Star Wars movie:

There's no place like home.

My favorite pictures from the day follow:

Obligatory Opening Day shot from Yawkey Way. Nice to see some flowers and buds on the trees!

Obligatory Opening Day shot from Yawkey Way. Nice to see some flowers and buds on the trees!

This year the netting behind home plate was extended all the way to the dugouts. I was glad to see that it didn't go all the way up like it does behind home plate. You can see the black outline around it, including a door where the entrance to the field is.  But it does mean I'm going to have to find somewhere else to move down to in the late innings when I want to get close-up pictures of the players.

This year the netting behind home plate was extended all the way to the dugouts. I was glad to see that it didn't go all the way up like it does behind home plate. You can see the black outline around it, including a door where the entrance to the field is. But it does mean I'm going to have to find somewhere else to move down to in the late innings when I want to get close-up pictures of the players.

One area that was renovated this year is the concession stands on the lower level behind third base, just inside Gate E. It looks nice, but they changed the concessions to a bar, meaning there's nowhere to get pizza slices on the whole left field side of the plate.

One area that was renovated this year is the concession stands on the lower level behind third base, just inside Gate E. It looks nice, but they changed the concessions to a bar, meaning there's nowhere to get pizza slices on the whole left field side of the park.

Three of the Boston champions who were featured in the opening ceremony - David Ortiz, Bill Rusell, and Ty Law.  Bobby Orr was there too to represent the Bruins.

Three of the Boston champions who were featured in the opening ceremony - David Ortiz, Bill Russell, and Ty Law. Bobby Orr was there too to represent the Bruins.

After Big Papi's 15-year-old daughter surprised him by singing the National Anthem, three other beloved players from the recent past joined him on the field.

After Big Papi's 15-year-old daughter surprised him by singing the National Anthem, three other beloved players from the recent past joined him on the field.

David Ortiz, Jason Varitek, Pedro Martinez, and Tim Wakefield came out to say "Play ball" and kick off the game. (Technically Tek covered Pedro's mouth as a joke, and the other three said it.)

David Ortiz, Jason Varitek, Pedro Martinez, and Tim Wakefield came out to say "Play ball" and kick off the game. (Technically Tek covered Pedro's mouth as a joke, and the other three said it.)

Pedro and Wake, old friends and two of my favorites.

Pedro and Wake, old friends and two of my favorites.

Mookie is required to homer in every road and home opener - he homered in both last year and in the road opener this year - and he did not disappoint, going deep in the ninth inning with his third hit of the day.

Mookie is required to homer in every road and home opener - he homered in both last year and in the road opener this year - and he did not disappoint, going deep in the ninth inning with his third hit of the day. (Come to think of it, he had homered in the first Spring Training game of the year too!)

Hanley Ramirez is doing well at first base and looks to be having fun.

Hanley Ramirez is doing well at first base and looks to be having fun.

Xander Bogaerts blows a bubble.

Xander Bogaerts blows a bubble.

Dustin Pedroia had another great play in the field.

Dustin Pedroia had another great play in the field, and two more hits.

Big Papi steps to the plate. He had two hits and an RBI, but grounded into a double play in the ninth.

Big Papi stepped to the plate in the ninth with two hits and an RBI, but he grounded into a double play.

Although the Red Sox jumped out to a 3-0 lead, David Price gave up five runs in five innings, but his teammates kept rallying to tie it 5-5 and 6-6.  The shocker came when fireballing new closer Craig Kimbrel walked two and then gave up a three-run homer to Chris Davis in the ninth.  The Sox staged one final rally in the bottom of the ninth and got the tying run on base, before ultimately falling short.

Wrapping Up

Tuesday, March 1, 2016 – JetBlue Park, Ft. Myers

Spring Training Workout

After playing the college doubleheader on Monday, it was back to a workout on Tuesday for the final time this year.  It was technically an unofficial workout, so the concession and souvenir stands were closed, but fans were still able to enter the complex and see what was going on.  With minor league camp in progress, the major leaguers were confined to three fields, with everyone who’s slated to be on the Opening Day roster ending the day by taking batting practice inside the stadium, where we can’t go.  But we did get to see them all briefly, albeit in some of the stranger drills of the spring, and were able to add to our autographs.

When the catchers finished their initial stretching they all went to one of the practice fields.  I thought there was going to be some sort of fielding drill, but instead it was literally practicing walking out to the mound as if to talk to a struggling pitcher.  “You’re in control of the game,” directed one coach.  “Wait, who was that smiling?” chided another.  Then they all walked back off the field and on to the next activity.  It’s pretty much the silliest drill I’ve ever seen at spring training, topping even the sliding drill and parachute run.  (But it got me thinking – shouldn’t they have a drill where the pitchers practice standing on the mound hanging their heads in shame after giving up a home run?  Or, for even more entertainment, have the manager practice taking the ball from a pitcher who doesn’t want to leave the game – imagine watching that during the Schilling era!  But I digress…)

The Catcher Walk.

Perfecting the Catcher Walk.

The next activity for the catchers was Story Hour, apparently.  They all sat cross-legged on the ground and listened to bullpen coach Dana LeVangie, while Torey Lovullo and Jason Varitek looked on.

The next activity for the catchers was Story Hour, apparently. They all sat cross-legged on the ground and listened to bullpen coach Dana LeVangie, while Torey Lovullo and Jason Varitek looked on.

That's right, I said Jason Varitek. The former Captain was there working with the catchers.  And he had his glove with him wherever he went, ready to go if needed.  Here, he talks with Pawtuket hitting coach and fellow former catcher, Rich Gedman.

That's right, I said Jason Varitek. The former Captain was in camp working with the catchers. And he had his glove with him wherever he went, ready to go if needed. Here, he talks with Pawtucket hitting coach and fellow former catcher, Rich Gedman.

Third base coach Brian Butterfield waves in Dustin Pedroia and David Ortiz in a baserunning drill.  Butterfield would call out the number of outs and players had to practice tagging up and scoring.

Third base coach Brian Butterfield waves in Dustin Pedroia and David Ortiz in a baserunning drill. Butterfield would call out the number of outs and players had to practice tagging up, scoring, and not bumping into each other.

Travis Shaw rounds third in the baserunning drill.

Travis Shaw rounds third in the baserunning drill.

A picture of Big Papi, because this is my last chance to see him in Spring Training action.

A picture of Big Papi, because this is my last chance to see him in Spring Training action.

Next it was time for my former favorite drill, sliding on sheets of black pastic that look like a Slip'n Slide. Here's David Murphy sliding in under the watchful eye of Dwight Evans. Murphy had been drafted by the Red Sox in 2003, made his debut in Boston in 2006, and then was traded to the Texas Rangers as part of the deal for Eric Gagne at the trade deadline in '07.  Since then he's played with the Rangers, Indians, and Angels, and he just signed back on with the Red Sox yesterday.

Next it was time for my other favorite drill, sliding into bases attached to sheets of black plastic that look like a Slip'N Slide. Here's David Murphy sliding in under the watchful eye of Dwight Evans. Murphy had been drafted by the Red Sox in 2003, made his M.L. debut with Boston in 2006, and then was traded to Texas as part of the deal for Eric Gagne at the trade deadline in '07. Since then he's played with the Rangers, Indians, and Angels, and he just signed back on with the Red Sox yesterday.

After the sliding was complete, the players who will start the year in the majors headed in to the stadium for batting practice, which unfortunately meant we couldn’t watch. But the guys who will likely start in Triple A stayed on the practice field to take B.P. out there.

New General Manager Mike Hazen watched batting practice and chatted with bench coach Torey Lovullo.

New General Manager Mike Hazen watched batting practice and chatted with bench coach Torey Lovullo.

Second base prospect Sean Coyle waits for his turn in batting practice.  After they were doen, he took the time to sign autographs, as did Lovullo, Gedman, and non-roster invitees Brennan Boesch and Ryan LaMarre.

Second base prospect Sean Coyle waits for his turn in batting practice. After they were done, he took the time to sign autographs, as did Lovullo, Gedman, and non-roster invitees Brennan Boesch and Ryan LaMarre.

With the workouts all wrapped up and the weather finally hot, we went back to Englewood Beach in the afternoon.  This time it was warm enough to go in the water, and scour the beach in search of the perfect shells.

Englewood Beach is great for shelling.

It was a great day for shell-hunting at Englewood Beach.

Play Ball

Monday, February 29, 2016 – JetBlue Park, Ft. Myers

Game 1 – Red Sox 6, Boston College Eagles 0

On Monday the Red Sox started off the 2016 season with their first two officially unofficial games against Boston College and Northeastern University.  We went early and walked around to the practice fields out back.  Minor league camp has just started, so three of the fields had kids from the low minors taking batting practice.  At the other end of the complex, the major league pitchers were out running.  We spotted 21-year-old outfielder Andrew Benintendi, who was the Sox’ first round pick in last year’s draft, and the 7th pick overall.  He made it as high as Single A Greenville last year and is projected to move up to High A this year.  He was nice enough to sign autographs and pose for pictures after finishing up practice.

Outfield prospect Andrew Benintendi.

Hopefully I'll get to see Andrew Benintendi at Fenway in a couple of years.

Then it was time for some real live baseball, even if it was a pair of 7-inning contests against college teams.  The real starting position players were all in the lineup, and it was absolutely beautiful baseball weather.

You can tell the baseball season has officially started when Pedey gets his uniform dirty.

Two innings in and Dustin Pedroia's uniform was already filthy. That's how we knew the season was officially underway.

Play ball!

Play ball!

Knuckleballer Steven Wright started the game and threw 2 innings, with 2 hits and 4 strikeouts.

Knuckleballer Steven Wright started the game and threw 2 innings, giving up no runs on 2 hits and 4 strikeouts.

Hanley Ramirez started at first base and played three innings in the field. He didn't have too many chances, but he caught the final out of a 6-4-3 double play (pictured here) and retired one batter unassisted on a groundout.

Hanley Ramirez started at first base and played three innings in the field. He didn't have too many chances, but he caught the final out of a 6-4-3 double play (pictured here) and retired one batter unassisted on a groundout.

The big blow in the first game was Mookie Betts’s towering homer over the Green Monster in the fourth.  Hanley Ramirez had two hits, and Dustin Pedroia, Xander Bogaerts, and Blake Swihart each had one.  Jackie Bradley Jr. walked twice.  The subs tacked on three more runs on two sac flies and a bases-loaded walk, and the Sox won the first game 6-0.

Game 2 – Red Sox 8, Northeastern Huskies 3

The second game started 40 minutes after the first game ended.  Brock Holt and Travis Shaw were the only two in the lineup who will open the season in the majors, and they figured into several of the early runs.  Brockstar walked and scored in the first and hit a sacrifice fly in the third.  Shaw had a single and a double, both of which drove in a run.

The second game featured a home run by Bryce Brentz and a triple by Brian LaMarre. Non-roster invitee Sean O'Sullivan made the start and had 2 hits and 4 strikeouts in his 2 shutout innings.

The second game featured a home run by Bryce Brentz and a triple by Brian LaMarre. Non-roster invitee Sean O'Sullivan made the start and had 2 hits and 4 strikeouts in his 2 shutout innings.

Ruben Amaro, former GM of the Phillies, is the new first base coach this year.

Ruben Amaro, former GM of the Phillies, is the new first base coach this year.

We got to see Cuban 20-year-old Yoan Moncada, currently the top-ranked prospect in the organization, when he came in as a sub in the second game. He had a single and a double, moved up on a wild picth, and scored a run.

We got to see 20-year-old second baseman Yoan Moncada, currently the top-ranked prospect in the organization, when he came in as a sub in the second game. He had a single and a double, moved up on a wild pitch, and scored a run.

The Red Sox survived a sixth-inning rally by Northeastern off Danny Rosenbaum and hung on to win 8-3.  Final tally for the day: I got to witness 12 pitchers, 30 position players, 2 wins, and the end of the long off-season.  Not bad for one day!

Warming Up

Sunday, February 28, 2016 – JetBlue Park, Ft. Myers

Spring Training Workout

Sunday brought warmer temperatures, and it finally felt like Florida.  The Red Sox had done their photo shoots for baseball cards and promos inside in the morning, so they were a little later than normal getting out to the field.  We saw some interesting drills, got a few more autographs, and ended by watching a Big Papi power display.  My favorite photos from the day are below.

Jackie Bradley Jr. waved to fans as the players took the field to stretch.  He also took the time to sign autographs on his way in at the end of the day.

Jackie Bradley Jr. waved to fans as the players took the field to stretch. He also took the time to sign autographs on his way in at the end of the day.

Hanley Ramirez and David Ortiz shared a laugh during the morning stretch.

Hanley Ramirez and David Ortiz shared a laugh during the morning stretch.

General manager Mike Hazen, Senior VP of Baseball Operations Frank Wren, and President of Baseball Operations Dave Dombrowski walked among the fields to observe the practice.

General Manager Mike Hazen, Senior VP of Baseball Operations Frank Wren, and President of Baseball Operations Dave Dombrowski walked among the fields to observe the practice.

Ryan Hanigan and the other catchers did a drill where they practiced throwing out runners at second and third.

Ryan Hanigan and the other catchers did a drill where they practiced throwing out runners at second and third.

Christian Vazquez is recovering from the Tommy John surgery had had less than a year ago. He's been catching, but he wasn't allowed to practice throwing out baserunners. During the drill he took the role of flipping the ball to the other catchers.

Christian Vazquez is recovering from the Tommy John surgery he had less than a year ago. He's been catching, but he wasn't allowed to practice throwing out baserunners. During that drill he took the role of flipping the ball to the other catchers.

The infielders and pitchers took part in a drill catching popups.  Non-roster invitee Sean O'Sullivan, who has 66 games of major league experience for the Angels, Royals, Padres, and Phillies over the past 6 seasons, will be the starting pitcher against Northeastern in the second game of Monday's college double header.

The infielders and pitchers took part in a drill catching popups. Non-roster invitee Sean O'Sullivan, who has 66 games of major league experience for the Angels, Royals, Padres, and Phillies over the past 6 seasons, will be the starting pitcher against Northeastern in the second game of Monday's college double header.

Everyone's favorite dirt dog Dustin Pedroia smiled during batting practice.

Everyone's favorite dirt dog Dustin Pedroia smiled during batting practice.

Big Papi put on a show in batting practice, at one point mashing five straight homers off the roof of the batting cages beyond the field.

Big Papi put on a show in batting practice, at one point mashing five straight homers off the roof of the batting cages beyond the field.

When fans applauded after one of his impressive rounds, Papi announced, "I was born for this."

When fans applauded after one of his impressive B. P. rounds, Papi announced, "I was born for this."

Dwight Evans was my favorite player in the 1980's, and is now a special instructor working with the young players. He took the time to sign autographs after practice, as did Jackie Bradley Jr., Xander Bogaerts, infield prospects Deven Marrero and Sam Travis, and third base coach Brian Butterfield.

Dwight Evans was my favorite player in the 1980's, and is now a special instructor working with the young players. He took the time to sign autographs after practice, as did Jackie Bradley Jr., Xander Bogaerts, infield prospects Deven Marrero and Sam Travis, and third base coach Brian Butterfield.

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